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Thursday, April 30, 2009

Czech Potato Dumpling Recipe

I have taken a brief absence from posting czech recipes. The reasons being primarily due to time constraints and having to cook really quick meals which is not always possible with eastern european cuisine. I will do my best to work in some tasty czech recipes here and there as this is what my blogsite is all about. That being said I will also be posting some non-czech family favorites which include some good summertime family barbecue recipes. For now I leave you with my family potato knedlicky recipe.

Czech Potato Dumpling Recipe

6 Potatoes, Peeled
1 Egg
1 1/2 teaspoon salt
1/4 cup farina
1/4 cup flour

1. Boil potatoes until fork tender.
2. When cooled, rice potatoes or mash (if you do not have a potato ricer).
3. Place riced potatoes into large bowl.
4. Work beaten egg, farina,flour and salt into potatoes forming a dough.
5. Roll dough into tube and cut into slices (or dumplings).
6. Place dumplings into pot of boiling water and boil for five minutes.
7. Remove and serve with Beef Roast or Veprova (Pork Roast).

Serving size will easily feed a family of four to six depending on heartiness of appetites.

6 comments:

kim said...

My sister and I were going down memory lane today,Oh our Nana's dumplings!!! Thank You for the treat, This is it! The Farina is the trick. I have been unable to duplicate the recipe,Thank You Thank You!! Kim Violino

4czech said...

Hey Kim. I am glad you found what you are looking for.

Anonymous said...

I am looking for a recipe similar to this which bakes the dumplings rather than boils them. They were called "piplets". The long rolls of potato were placed in a casserole, covered with milk and butter and baked. Texture was very firm. Had them as a child in MIlwaukee and trmember them as being eastern European

annbern said...

I inherited a recipe jut like this from my Czech mother but wasn't sure if the potatoes had to be cooked first. Thank you for the answer.
My mother baked them with butter brushed on the top.
Ann

test blogger said...

My Grandma Horton (Sedlak) was her maiden name, would take the leftover mashed potatoes from any meal (but mostly Thanks Giving Diner) and after all of the kids were done "helping" with the dishes and leftovers, Grandma and Mom would go to work on my favorite desert. Potato dumplings with fruit inside, served with real melted butter and cinnamon/sugar. Oh how I miss Grandma! I recall the mashed potato were set on the board, they added some flower (or I guess it could have been Farina) an egg and some salt, mixed by hand (sometimes by me or my brothers and sisters, 5 all together) then pressed or rolled into saucer size pcs, then the goodness of Peaches, Plumbs, Prunes, apricots, whatever Grandma had in the pantry on the back porch! (Probably leftover from the hundreds of kolache). then in a pot of boiling water until they floated. We were on our best behavior when standing in line for them fresh and hot! does the recipe sound correct? Is my memory remotely close? Thank you so much. Regards, D Horton

test blogger said...

My Grandma Horton (Sedlak) was her maiden name, would take the leftover mashed potatoes from any meal (but mostly Thanks Giving Diner) and after all of the kids were done "helping" with the dishes and leftovers, Grandma and Mom would go to work on my favorite desert. Potato dumplings with fruit inside, served with real melted butter and cinnamon/sugar. Oh how I miss Grandma! I recall the mashed potato were set on the board, they added some flower (or I guess it could have been Farina) an egg and some salt, mixed by hand (sometimes by me or my brothers and sisters, 5 all together) then pressed or rolled into saucer size pcs, then the goodness of Peaches, Plumbs, Prunes, apricots, whatever Grandma had in the pantry on the back porch! (Probably leftover from the hundreds of kolache). then in a pot of boiling water until they floated. We were on our best behavior when standing in line for them fresh and hot! does the recipe sound correct? Is my memory remotely close? Thank you so much. Regards, D Horton